Antarctica—Melting Faster Than Imagined

For many years the scientific world has been aware that Antarctica is melting. Recent studies, however, show that the ice has been melting three to five times faster than anticipated. Between 1992 and 2017 the Antarctic lost approximately 3.3 trillion …
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Water From Air—A Miracle Solution?

Fact—10% of the Earth’s fresh water, an estimated 13 trillion liters, is found in its atmosphere. Fact—in humid climates up to 6% of the air contains fresh water. In arid climates the air still contains an average of 0.7% water. …
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Water in Industry Today: What You Need to Know

Roughly two thirds of the world’s fresh water usage is dedicated to agriculture, including irrigation, livestock and aquaculture. Approximately another 10% of water usage is for municipal purposes, including both domestic and public use. Pretty much the rest of the …
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Toxic Ash—A Disaster for Our Water Sources

There is an old saying, “You can’t fight Mother Nature.” This saying is especially true when it comes to natural disasters, such as volcanic eruptions and wildfires, which are two of the three main sources of toxic ash. The third …
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European Utility Week 2017: How to be a Prosumer

  ARAD Group is proud to have exhibited at European Utility Week 2017 in Amsterdam. This year’s event featured a special program, CIED, Commercial and Industrial Energy User Days, which we found particularly interesting. In today’s world of limited resources …
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Water Value: Changing Our Perception

The Diamond-Water Paradox There’s nothing like a good paradox, wouldn’t you say? Philosophers as far back as Socrates and Plato have pondered the “paradox of value”. In his documentation of a Socratic dialog, Plato writes: “For only what is rare …
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Smart Urban Agriculture: Is It Here to Stay?

Urban agriculture certainly isn’t new: the vegetable gardens that sprung up during World War Two in UK and US cities, for example, were an iconic part of the civilian war effort. What is somewhat surprising, perhaps, is the extent of …
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